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Tropical Storm Fred track LIVE

TROPICAL depression Fred is strengthening and could regain tropical storm status on Friday before smashing Florida on Saturday, forecasters said.

The system was dropping heavy rain over parts of Cuba, where it was expected to keep moving along the island’s northern coast through Friday night.

The main threats were rain and flooding. A tropical storm warning was issued Friday morning for the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. A tropical storm watch was in place for southwest Florida and parts of Cuba.

The hurricane center said 3 to 7 inches of rain were expected across the Florida Keys and southern peninsula by Monday, with isolated maximums of 10 inches.

Once a tropical storm, Fred weakened back to a depression by its spin over Haiti and the Dominican Republic, where it knocked out power to some 400,000 customers and caused flooding that forced officials to shut down part of the country’s aqueduct system, interrupting water service for hundreds of thousands of people.

Local officials reported hundreds of people were evacuated and some buildings were damaged. There were no immediate reports of casualties.

Read our Tropical Storm Fred live blog for the latest news and updates…

 

  • WHAT IS A TROPICAL STORM?

    A tropical storm, also referred to as a tropical cyclone, is a rapidly rotating storm system.

    A tropical storm can be characterized by:

    • A low-pressure center
    • A closed low-level atmospheric circulation
    • Strong winds
    • A Spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that lead to heavy rain and/or squalls

    The sustained surface wind speed of a tropical storm ranges from 39 mph to 73 mph.

  • TROPICAL STORM STRENGTH ‘STILL IN PLAY’

  • FRED COULD ‘REDEVELOP’ INTO STORM

    Authorities are forecasting that Fred could likely redevelop from a wave to a depression to a tropical storm yet again.

    Fred is currently in the Gulf of Mexico, moving towards Cuba tracking west-northwestward at 10 to 15mph, The Weather Channel reports.

  • FRED IS DEAD

    The NHS reports that Fred has now degenerated from a Depression to a “disorganized wave.”

    Tropical Storm Grace still continues towards Florida.

  • WARNINGS OF ‘RAPID RIVER RISES’

    For Fred, the concern is the potential urban areas to experience river conditions, along with actual “rapid river rises.”

    The NHC projects Monday the Florida Keys and southern Peninsula could see 3 to as much as 8 inches of rain brought on by “heavy rainfall.”

    Conditions in the ocean are also expected to become more torrential in the days ahead of Fred’s US landing. 

  • FRED FUELS FLASH FLOODS

    As of Wednesday, Fred’s already caused flash flooding conditions in the Dominican Republic and other countries like Haiti and Cuba are also expected to get dangerously drenched.

    Around 300,000 customers’ power blacked out and more than a half-million were being affected by the rainfalls causing rising rivers that shut down part of the aqueduct system, government officials reported.

  • FRED IS 20 DAYS AHEAD OF AVERAGE STORM FORMATION DATE

  • WHAT IS FRED’S PATH?

    On Friday, August 13, 2021, Fred was pouring rain on eastern Cuba.

    The storm is expected to move through the Florida Keys on Saturday August 14. The ultimate destination is reported to be the Florida Panhandle.

    The path is expected to be along or just north of Cuba’s northern coast on Friday, and move near the Florida Keys on Saturday, before reaching the west coast of Florida.

  • FRED TO BECOME TROPICAL STORM

    Meteorologists are forecasting that Fred, currently classified as a Tropical Depression, will strengthen yet again into a Tropical Storm.

    It is expected to hit Florida and Alabama on Monday night, according to Jessica Dobson from WMBF-TV.

  • SEVERAL INCHES OF RAIN EXPECTED

    South Florida is expected to see several inches of rainfall.

  • ‘FLOODING RAINFALL THREAT COVERS’ ALL OF FLORIDA

    Experts said the entire Florida peninsula could face the threat of flooding.

  • FLORIDA GOVERNMENT WARNS RESIDENTS OF HOW TO GET WEATHER WARNINGS

    “Residents in these areas should have multiple ways to receive weather alerts & warnings,” the Division of Emergency Management said.

  • FLORIDA GOVERNOR DECLARES STATE OF EMERGENCY

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis declared a state of emergency for 23 counties in the state on Friday night, according to ABC News.

  • ‘ABOVE AVERAGE’ STORM SEASON

    Last week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported there was a 65 percent chance of an “above-average” storm season, with a 70 percent probability of 15-21 named storms. 

    Seven to 10 of the hurricanes could reach Category 3, 4, or 5 strengths.

  • CYCLONE GRACE ‘BEHIND’ STORM FRED

    “Behind Fred is Potential Tropical Cyclone Seven,” the Weather Channel reported.

  • FRED ‘INCHING CLOSER’ TO FLORIDA

    Weather reports show Fred is “inching closer to South Florida.”

  • FROM TROPICAL STORM FRED TO TROPICAL CYCLONE GRACE

    Florida could also face a tropical cyclone named Grace.

  • ‘POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE’

    Storm Fred has the potential to become a tropical cyclone.

  • SEVERAL INCHES OF RAIN EXPECTED

    South Florida is expected to see several inches of rainfall.

  • ‘FLOODING RAINFALL THREAT COVERS’ ALL OF FLORIDA

    Experts said the entire Florida peninsula could face the threat of flooding.

  • FLORIDA GOVERNMENT WARNS RESIDENTS OF HOW TO GET WEATHER WARNINGS

    “Residents in these areas should have multiple ways to receive weather alerts & warnings,” the Division of Emergency Management said.

  • STORM EXPECTED TO LAST THROUGH THE WEEKEND

    A storm warning said that the effects of Tropical Storm Fred would be felt throughout the weekend.

  • FLORIDA GOVERNOR DECLARES STATE OF EMERGENCY

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis declared a state of emergency for 23 counties in the state on Friday night, according to ABC News.

  • ‘ABOVE AVERAGE’ STORM SEASON

    Last week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported there was a 65 percent chance of an “above-average” storm season, with a 70 percent probability of 15-21 named storms. 

    Seven to 10 of the hurricanes could reach Category 3, 4, or 5 strengths.

  • ‘RAPID RIVER RISES’

    For Fred, the concern is the potential urban areas to experience river conditions, along with actual “rapid river rises.”

    The NHC projects Monday the Florida Keys and southern Peninsula could see 3 to as much as 8 inches of rain brought on by “heavy rainfall.”

    Conditions in the ocean are also expected to become more torrential in the days ahead of Fred’s US landing. 

    The Dominican Republic, US Virgin Island, and Puerto Rico could experience “life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.”

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