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PROPERTY

Notting Hill flat is £1,300-a-month

A FLAT in world-famous Notting Hill has gone on the market for £1,300 a month – but the new tenant will face a baffling challenge before going to bed.

And restless sleepers who toss and turn before finally nodding off may want to skip a viewing altogether.

A flat with a baffling bedroom has gone on the market for £1,300 a month - and those who toss and turn in their sleep need not apply

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A flat with a baffling bedroom has gone on the market for £1,300 a month – and those who toss and turn in their sleep need not apply
The studio is in swanky Kensington Gardens Square, close to Notting Hill and Hyde Park

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The studio is in swanky Kensington Gardens Square, close to Notting Hill and Hyde Park

That’s because the studio features an alarming-looking ‘mezzanine’ bedroom – where falling out of bed will bruise more than just a resident’s ego.

Photos of the flat in swanky Kensington Gardens Square show a mattress propped on a shelf overlooking the living space.

The edge of the futon is just inches from a sheer drop.

Meanwhile, none of the images show how the tenant is expected to climb between the sheets at the end of a long day.

No obvious steps are in place to allow the occupant to scale the seven feet between the living room and the bedroom.

But for those who have a head for heights – and tend not to move too much in their sleep – the apartment has plenty to recommend it.

It comes fully-furnished, with a sofa and fitted kitchen. The property even has a bath – although the tiny tub has sitting room only.

The big draw will be the location.

It stands close to major Tube lines including Notting Hill Gate and Bayswater, while Hyde Park is a walk away.

Agents at Marsh & Parsons say the “fantastic” flat “benefits from high ceilings, excellent storage a separate kitchen and a mezzanine sleeping area”.

“The property further benefits from an abundance of natural light and access to a beautiful communal garden,” they add.

Average rents in the area are £521 a week according to Foxtons estate agents, but can range from £160 to £1,700 depending on the type of property.

BAFFLING BEDROOM

London is well-known by renters for its innovative – and occasionally bizarre – solutions to small spaces.

One property in Notting Hill is currently on the market for a little under £800 a month – but it’s missing one essential feature.

While the studio offers a shower, there’s no toilet to be found.

Even more oddly, the listing doesn’t mention a loo at all – leaving potential tenants to speculate about what they can expect if they decide to move in.

Earlier this month, we shared photos of another Notting Hill flat hilariously billed as “spacious” by landlords – even though it doesn’t offer a bed or shower.

RENTERS’ STRUGGLES

Agents describe the bedsit as “fully furnished” in a glowing ad on Gumtree.

However, according to the photos, the flat offers just a fridge, a small hob with two electric rings, a sink and a microwave.

We also reported on a pokey studio flat with a bed fitted in a windowless cupboard.

The digs – which lie between Stockwell and Brixton in South London – cost a whopping £1,050 per month, excluding bills.

And when it’s time for bed, the occupier must climb a wooden ladder before nodding off in a cupboard fitted with a double mattress.

RENTING RIGHTS

Your property must be fit to live in and be safe, healthy and free from things that could cause serious harm.

If your house falls below these standards, you could take your landlord to court.

There are also rules in place to stop overcrowding in small houses.

To find out if your house is overcrowded, count the number of people living there (a child aged 10 or over counts as a person), and count the number of bedrooms and living rooms.

A maximum of two people to one room is allowed, as well as a maximum of three people to two rooms, and three people to five rooms.

You can check to see whether your home is overcrowded using Shelter’s guidebook on it’s website.

Citizens Advice says you should complain to your landlord if your home doesn’t meet these standards, or you’re unhappy with your living conditions.

You should put your complaints down in writing, either in a letter or email, so you have evidence of your conversation.

If your landlord doesn’t fix the problem, you should tell your local council – again, make sure you email or send a letter.

You can find which one is yours using the gov.uk’s council finder tool.

Send a copy of any evidence following your call or with your letter, for example photos showing the problem.

Photos for the property don't show how the tenant is expected to get to bed in the evening - with no obvious signs of stairs

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Photos for the property don’t show how the tenant is expected to get to bed in the evening – with no obvious signs of stairs
Elsewhere, the occupant will discover a mini bath with sitting room only

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Elsewhere, the occupant will discover a mini bath with sitting room only
There's also a modern-looking fitted kitchen

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There’s also a modern-looking fitted kitchen
Manchester flat inspired by Batman’s Gotham City goes up for sale for £400k

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